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Get your church involved during elections

April 8, 2017 by Ellen Janoski

During elections, do you wonder what your church can and cannot do?

Our nation’s success depends on the church’s influence.  The founding Fathers intended and expected Christians to participate in and to lead the political process.

John Jay, First Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court said,

“Providence has given our people the choice of their rulers, and it is the duty, as well as privilege and interest of a Christian nation to select and prefer Christians for their rulers.”

Although the church is not allowed to participate in “campaign intervention” there is much it can do to educate and inform Christians to engage and vote wisely.

What Churches May Do:

  • Distribute non-partisan voter education materials, such as iVoterGuide.
  • Conduct non-partisan voter registration drives.
  • Encourage people to fulfill their moral and ethical obligation to vote, as long as it’s done in a non-partisan manner.
  • Host candidate or issue forums, provided each candidate is invited.
  • Allow candidates and elected officials to speak at church services.

What Pastors May Do:

  • Preach the truth of God’s word regarding specific issues and encourage congregants to vote with biblical truth in mind.
  • Endorse candidates in their capacity as private citizens – A pastor does not lose his right to free speech because he is an employee of a church. Encourage your pastor to post his endorsements on his personal social media accounts.
  • Participate fully in political committees that are independent of the church.
  • Lobby for legislation in their private capacity.

Get your church involved in local elections. Provide resources to your church on where to get a Christian voter guide; use our resources here.

 

Ellen Janoski

Ellen came to iVoterGuide with a background in political campaigns including her own run for the Kansas State House of Representatives in 2010. She oversaw the Political Management Team for a leading public relations firm in Pennsylvania. Ellen worked for The Leadership Institute in Washington, D.C. and traveled across America teaching a wide-array of political workshops including grassroots, campaign management, social media marketing and fundraising.Ellen has been a consultant and an activist for various political campaigns ranging from small town judicial races all the way to holding campaign positions in presidential campaigns.Recently Ellen was appointed by the Governor of Kansas to sit on a state board.

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